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Hunter Jones and Amble Johnson were inaugural fellows of the Georgia Sea Grant Legal Program in 2015.

Georgia Sea Grant Legal Fellows

A real-world environmental law and policy training program

The Georgia Sea Grant Legal Program offers students at the University of Georgia School of Law the opportunity to work with legal and policy experts to address challenging environmental questions facing policymakers in coastal Georgia communities.

Based in Athens, selected law students work as paid student legal fellows during the academic year or summer. Students gain practical experience in collaborating with local policymakers, scientists and business communities and in performing expert analyses to inform decision-making. The inaugural class of fellows has been selected for Spring and Summer 2015.

Objectives of the Georgia Sea Grant Legal Fellowship:

  • Provide relevant professional experience for law students interested in careers in environmental law and policy
  • Train students to develop policy memos and white papers focusing on environmental problems challenging local governments
  • Conduct legal and policy analyses on coastal environmental issues of interest to coastal Georgia stakeholders
  • Collaborate with decision-makers and community leaders to solve complex coastal resource management issues.
     

2014-2015 Fellows

Amble Johnson, a second-year law student at the University of Georgia School of Law, is working with Tybee Island on its preparations for sea-level rise. He is currently conducting research on the application of federal voluntary property acquisition programs to Tybee Island and other coastal Georgia communities. Johnson also serves as a research assistant at the Alexander Campbell King Law Library at UGA. He served as co-chair of 2015 Red Clay Conference, an environmental law conference at the UGA School of Law.


Hunter Jones, a third-year law student at the University of Georgia School of Law, is preparing policy memos focusing on the participation of coastal Georgia cities and counties in the Community Rating System (CRS), a federal program incentivizing communities to take steps to reduce their flood risk. Jones has focused her legal studies on environmental law and is interested in a career in environmental policy. She served as co-chair of the 2015 Red Clay Conference, an environmental law conference at the UGA School of Law.